Multiple Issues Related to Climate Change | By: Rachel Cross

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As a future Landscape Architect, I envision our work as a whole, to change. With climate change and population growth becoming a greater concern, we as designers will have to efficiently design cities that are able to grow effectively and be environmentally savvy. As a landscape architect, my hope is that we can create the same opportunities for all types of people. I believe that you should be able to create designs for all, even those who may have disabilities. Lastly, I believe that it is important to partner with professionals who have similar but different backgrounds to efficiently mix ideas and create new opportunities through the design of the world.

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Equity & Environments | By: Marcos Aleman

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As a landscape architect, I want to give my service where it is needed to uphold equity, sustainability and education. Providing the right environment and education to people who need them can open the gateways needed to a better life and a better world.

I see landscape architecture as a crucial link between many disciplines that can influence how we move into the future. We have the tools and knowledge to bring vital information and experiences to people around the world. I want our discipline to be known as those who enhance communities and improve the environment, rather than those who cater to the privileged and the rich. Our services are needed across the world and we should be ready to apply them to the best of our abilities.

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The Relationship of Social Equity & Landscape Architecture | By: Madison Quincke

Picture1As landscape architect, I envision our roles to be intertwined between
the realms of the environment, the people, and policy. We should act as designers, advocates, educators, and citizens of the community reaching many scales in our daily work with forward-thinking goals and ideas. Overall, we have the opportunity to bond people and nature in a meaningful way, fostering stewardship, social interaction, and ecological thinking.”

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Examining Environmental Issues through a Social Justice Lens | By: Mack Yeagar

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Environmental Justice is the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people regardless of race, color, national origin, or income, with respect to the development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations and policies.

Environmental injustice recognizes that economically disadvantaged groups are adversely affected by environmental hazards more than other groups

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Resilience of Urban Ecosystem | By: Priyasha Shrestha

Picture1The world is prone to disturbances: many are natural (volcanoes,floods, earthquakes, etc.) and others are man-made (climate change, fires, deforestation, desertificaion, etc.). Urban ecosystems, whichcomprise of natural and man-made systems, must display an extent of resilience to these disturbances to avoid shifting to another state.

In 2015, there were two massive earthquakes in Nepal, which not only shook the ground, but also the lives of people, by destroying property, livelihoods, and human and ecological communities. In such circumstances, if there had been planned open spaces linked together by multi-modal networks in place, and disaster response functions designed in the buildings, infrastructure and public spaces, then maybe so many casualties would not have occurred. If planning initiatives had taken into consideration risk locations and improvised density according to that, then maybe Kathmandu would have had a much easier time recuperating from the loss of life, livelihood and infrastructure. Thus, the concept of resilience is of substantial importance in urban planning and landscape considerations.

Human activities are putting critical habitats at risk. Activities such as resource mining, deforestation, pollution, uncontrolled urbanization, are all causing the loss of habitats and the shift of stable ecosystem states to other homogenized states lacking in diversity and reduced ecosystem functions. Rise in sea levels due to increase in global temperature is one of the many crucial issues that requires resilience planning. Coastal development in places such as Florida, are beingput at risk because of excessive flooding and storm surges that occurdue to the rising sea levels. In such places, planning that allows for preparedness to tackle such disturbances is necessary. Landscape onsiderations such as retaining coastal wetlands for protection against rising water levels, and habitat corridors that allow the movement ofthese wetland flora and fauna inland, as well as well-planned escaperoutes and adaptation mechanisms are all examples of resilience planning.

As landscape architects, we understand the nature and importanceof critical interactions between the different components of theecosystem. With this understanding and with the power to create meaningful public open spaces we can create places that respond tothe context, ecology and the needs of the people. The field of landscapearchitecture has the strength to be at the forefront of advocating for sustainability and resilience, and in tackling multi-scale problems such as climate change, habitat loss, social inequity in public spaces, and diminishing natural resources. As a future landscape architect, I plan on striving towards environmental conservation, socio-ecologicalresilience, and cultural sensibility in my design and planning efforts, and strive to extend awareness of the field across scales and borders.I believe that resilience thinking is necessary to achieve these goals.

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Importance of Education in Landscape Architecture | By: Kate Larkin

Picture5As a Landscape Architect I believe we need to carefully consider the environment and the people we are designing for in order to connect them. We need to continue to become more knowledgeable and increase awareness to influence other people to become educated on environmental issues, so they can help make a change.
A Landscape Architect promotes social equity and provides opportunities for all people to experience outdoor spaces. They create meaningful designs that connect people to the environment and influence sustainable practices. Landscape architects have knowledge on many different topics that allow us to make educated decisions when developing the environment. We can share this knowledge and use it motivate other disciplines to be cautious and make smart decisions.

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Landscape Booklet: Emphasis on Sustainability | By: Allyssa Gray

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Our duty is to design for people in a way that is inclusive for all while being thoughtful of the surrounding context. As time goes forward, we have to adapt to the changes that occur. Currently we are in a situation of designing for rapid climate change and we have to be sensitive to that while designing for the client. We need to keep pushing for the integration of disciplines, advocate, educate the public about landscape architecture and the role we have in society.

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Nature in Cities | By: Caleb Parker

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Landscape Architects have a wide range of skills that allows them to work with a diverse group of professionals. It is important that they use this skill set to take the lead one projects because they can ensure that the project is well rounded. Landscape architects should also be advocates for change, and use their knowledge to educate people through design. It is also important that landscape architects get community members involved during the design process because the people who live in a place know the most about it and they are also the ones who are going to have to live there once the project is completed. Landscape Architects can use their skills to help build healthy cities through a variety of ways.

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Landscape Booklet | By: Cody Borwege

Picture3The future role of the landscape architect it that of a mediator. We have strategically placed our profession at the cross roads of design interventions and being stewards the land. Landscape architects use a lens that doesn’t extend to other professions and are trained to take in large amounts of information and produce results that acknowledge the best route of action unadulterated by bias.

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An investigation of preservation | By: Danielle Hodgson

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As a landscape architect, my vision statement is to create space that promotes, enhances, and sustains outdoor space that unites the natural and built environment. I design with Olmsted’s and John Muir’s vision in mind— I prioritize social equity with the preservation of the natural environment. The growth and changing population of people must be accounted for in order to design efficient space that accommodates all forms of life and future expansion to protect vulnerable natural areas. The future of landscape architecture will involve greater interaction with buildings as rapid urbanization and population growth jeopardizes city centers. It will influence architecture an engineering, as those professions will have to take greater account of incorporating precious moments and exposure to the outside realm. As gentrification becomes a greater risk to vulnerable communities, landscape architecture will have to work harder to preserve the integrity and lifestyles of these areas through planning, transportation and accessibility. We will have to take greater care to protect the natural environment as we grow, and play a crucial role on the path to healthy coexistence.

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Vision Statement re Written & Future Role of Landscape Architect

Picture1Read your initial vision statement that you submitted in the class and –after engaging in multiple readings, documentaries, debates discussions, lectures, landscape architecture foundation, and group work– try to re-write your own visions statement now. It is important to be articulate and precise. Then in 4-5 lines, and in light of challenges discussed in class, describe the anticipated future role of the landscape architect and how this role can influence other disciplines that closely work with the landscape architect.

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International Development Project: Assessment & Suggested Improvement

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In groups of two, and based on the projects you selected in class, write an overall critique of these projects, initiatives, or activities. In no more than three pages, provide a brief description for the project, the lead organization that is working on it, and an assessment for the project performance looking at its environmental and social components. If you are the UN secretary general and have the power to encourage, or stop this project, would you approve/implement this project (as it is) or not? After your critic and reflection, provide three direct actions that if taken into account will significantly improve the project. Make sure to add the name of your project, location and overall theme. Use the material in earlier classes to have a critical lens on the project development.

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